menu
Job Title or Company Name
State, city
talimat veren zenci kivircik saclari cekilirken porno kendisini harika hissediyordu etrafa beni birakan abaza orospunun pornolar ondan 200 dolar rica etmesini reddedip her sey karsilikli zevk porno izle almak ucunde diyerek orospuya cevabini ve son kararini soyledi ustunlugunu porno kurdugu partnerine kolayca soz gecirip soylediklerini yaptiriyordu becerin dercesine Azgin kadin kocasina baska kizlari sIktirmekten zevk rokettube alir Bundan dolayi da surekli olarak kocasina baska kizlari sIktirir porno Evine gelen kiz kardesinin kocasina nasil baktigini gorunce durumu anlar konulu porno Mukemmel vucudu olan adam baldizinin direk dikkatini cekmistir pornolar Liseli kiza mesaj gelir ve erkek arkadasi onu eve davet eder Ancak onun kalin aletinin basi icine girdiginde sex hikayeleri hic bitmesini istemedigi anlar yasayip haz alirken daha fazla bastirmasi porno hikayeleri icin yalvarir Misafir adam uykusunda uyurken kirmizi elbiseyi giymis olan ensest hikayeler hatun yavas hareketlerle adamin penisiyle oynamaya baslar
Myths That Keep You From Landing A Job

Category: Applying For Jobs

Views2161


With so few jobs currently available and so many people
currently hoping to fill those jobs, standing out in an interview is of utmost
importance. While jobs themselves are scarce, job advice is overly abundant.
And with an influx of information comes an influx of confusion. What career
counsel do you take, and what do you ignore?



There are a number of common misconceptions related to interview
best practices. Below are tips that can help you stand out from other interview
subjects, avoid frequent pitfalls, and secure the job.





Myth 1: Be prepared with a list of questions to ask at the
close of the interview:
There is some truth in this common piece of advice: You
should always be prepared, and that usually includes developing questions
related to the job. The myth here is that you must wait until it is "your
turn" to speak.



By waiting until the interviewer asks you if you have any
questions, it becomes an interrogation instead of a conversation.



Experts recommend that you think of an interview as a sales
call. You are the product and you are selling yourself to the employer. You
can't be passive in a sales call or you aren't going to sell your product. Asking
a follow-up question at the tail end of your responses will do you good.



For example, if the interviewer says, "Tell me about
yourself," you first respond to that question and complete your response
with a question like, "Can you tell me more about the position?" The
interview should be a dialogue.





Myth 2: Do not show weakness in an interview:The reality is that it is OK to have flaws. In fact, almost
every interviewer will ask you to name one. Typically job seekers are told to
either avoid this question by providing a "good flaw." One such
"good flaw" which is often recommends is: "I am too committed to
my work." But, these kinds of responses will only hurt you.



Recruiters conduct interviews all day, every day. They've
seen it all and can see through candidates who dodge questions. They prefer to
hire someone who is honest than someone who is obviously lying.



And for those of you who claim to be flaw-free, think again.
Everybody has weaknesses but one is enough. Supply your interviewer with one
genuine flaw, explain how you are working to correct it, and then move on to a
new question.





Myth 3: Be sure to point out all of your strengths and
skills to the employer:
Of course, you want the interviewer to know why you are a
valuable candidate, but a laundry list of your skills isn't going to win you
any points. Inevitably, in an interview, you will be asked about your skills.
What can go wrong in this scenario?



You don't want to list a litany of strengths. What is
typical is that they will say: 'I'm a good communicator,' 'I have excellent
interpersonal skills,' 'I am responsible.' 
You have to give accomplishments. The interviewer needs to know what you
accomplished when using these skills.



Experts recommend doing a little groundwork before your
interview so that you are best equipped to answer this question. Find out what
the prospective job role consists of. What makes an interview powerful is to give
an example related to your particular needs or challenges that you have
demonstrated in the past.



Provide three strengths, with examples. You will get much
further with a handful of real strengths than with an unconvincing list of
traits.





Myth 4: Let the employer know your salary expectations: One of the trickiest questions to answer in an interview
relates to salary. Money talk can be uncomfortable, but it doesn't have to be.
The fact is you don't even have to answer when asked about desired salary. A
perfect response would be: "I want to earn a salary that is commensurate
with the contributions I can make. I am confident I can make a substantial
contribution at your firm. What does your firm plan to pay for this
position?"



Experts suggest a similar response: "I prefer to
discuss the compensation package after you've decided that I'm the best
candidate and we can sit down and negotiate the package."





Myth 5: The employer determines whether or not you get the job: While yes, the employer must be the one to offer you the
position, interviewees have more control than they often realize. According to
both Greene and Frankel, candidates have a larger say in the final hiring
decision than they think.



Candidates should call the interviewer or hiring manager and
say: 'I'd really like to be part of the company'. It can't hurt you. It can
only help.



Experts encourage all candidates to conclude their
interviews with one question: "'Based on our interview, do you have any concerns
about my ability to do the job?' -- If the answer is yes, ask the interviewer
to be explicit. Deal forthrightly with each concern.



Comment